Stations

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Stations of the Cross
Maggie McClellan
Installed 2018 – St. David’s Episcopal Church
Englewood, Florida

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It’s been interesting to note that my journey with religious art follows in the footsteps of my grandfather, William Genders, who was trained in England, was a World War I combat artist. There were always tales that he had done some works for churches, either in Delaware and/or Indiana. After finishing my last commission, my brother found the inserted article about a work he did for All Saints Cathedral in Indianapolis.

In Miami, where I had lived for 32 years, and where my art career started, my work grew stronger, and I began my journey with doing religious paintings. The first exposure was designing the murals for Germantown Baptist Church in Memphis, Tennessee.

When I moved to the west coast of Florida, I found myself involved with St. David’s Episcopal Church. The first paintings I did for this church was for their food bank building. It was supposed to cover a hole in the bathroom but quickly grew to a request for a larger work in the main room. I chose to depict the time when Jesus changed fish and bread into enough to feed the masses that had gathered to hear him speak. Many of the parishioners for St. David’s modeled for these paintings.

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A couple of years after I had finished those 3 paintings, the church had to destroy hymnals, prayer books and any art works that had been irrevocably damaged by a mold infestation, including the delicate watercolors of the Stations of the Cross. I was asked if I would do like to do a series of work to replace the watercolors.

The church is a modern facility with beautiful stain glass windows between which each station nested. These windows are modern, abstract in design with a strong color palette. I felt that paintings that were designed to augment these windows would tie the basic appeal of the sanctuary together.

Images below show process for achieving the painting to the left.

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The images below are “sliders”. Hover over the image and you will see “arrows” on the right and the left. Hover over the arrows and the images will change.

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